What the road to the presidency looks like for the two candidates


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The Curb Event Center is lit with red and white lights two days before the Second Presidential Debate on October 20 in Nashville. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Inside Joe Biden’s home in Wilmington, Delaware, Bob Bauer, the generally soft-spoken veteran Democratic lawyer, attacks the former vice president.

Bauer interrupts and yells at Biden, who tries to frame his arguments as to why he should be president.

Bauer takes on the role of President Trump in preparing for the mock debate – often playing the president as he behaved in the first debate in order to prepare Biden to stay on the message in case Trump gets through the new measures set up by the Presidential Debates Committee to avoid interruptions.

The Biden team is concerned that the plan to mute candidates during parts of the debate will not help the distraction factor. Even though the audience at home can’t hear the president’s microphone if he interrupts Biden, the Democratic candidate will stand right there and hear him loud and clear. Not paying attention to the man next to him is an important part of preparing Biden to step into the ring one last time with the president.

Biden and Trump head to their last scheduled showdown of the 2020 campaign, with 12 days to go Election day. And their respective teams are studying the first debate, which plunged into chaos as Trump continually interrupted Biden. Lessons learned from that initial match inform recommendations made to contestants as they prepare to take the stage one final time.

Trump’s advisers begged the president to try a different tactic this time around.

Republican sources told CNN that not only did the president’s internal poll numbers drop due to his erratic performance in the first debate, but his Republican colleagues, especially vulnerable Republican senators, were also affected in their own. poll because of Trump’s behavior on stage with Biden.

Kellyanne Conway, who was part of the team that helped prepare the president for the first debate inside the White House’s Map Room, said she had warned him not to interrupt too much.

“My final piece of advice to the president, which I shared with him directly and shared with him before the first debate, let Biden speak,” Conway relayed in an interview.

Conway and other Trump advisers reiterate their point to him ahead of the latest debate that the more Trump talks about Biden, the worse it is for Biden.

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