Fairfax Co.’s controversial books also caused a stir nationwide


[ad_1]

Two books that led to debate in the public school system in Fairfax County, Va., have also sparked nationwide controversy, according to the American Library Association.

Two books that led to debate in the public school system in Fairfax County, Va., have also sparked nationwide controversy, according to the American Library Association.

The ALA released a report on Monday noting that it recorded 729 challenges – affecting nearly 1,600 books – in schools and public libraries in 2021. That’s more than double 2020’s numbers, and the highest since ALA began compiling challenges more than 20 years ago.

“What we’ve seen are organized campaigns to remove certain categories of books,” said Deborah Caldwell-Stone, director of ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. “These campaigns were really initiated during the summer of 2021.”

The two most contested books on the list included ‘Gender Queer’, Maia Kobabe’s graphic memoir on sexual identity, and Jonathan Evison’s ‘Lawn Boy’, a coming-of-age novel told by a young homosexual.

These books were temporarily removed from Fairfax County high school shelves last year after critics claimed they contained sexually explicit content.

The school system’s decision to return the books follows a thorough review that lasted about two months.

The library association defines a “challenge” as a “formal, written complaint to a library or school requesting that materials be removed because of their content or relevance.”



“We’re also seeing the impact of social media,” Caldwell-Stone said. “Facebook videos and Twitter complaints are going viral.”

Others on the ALA list, virtually all cited for LGBTQ or racial themes, include Angie Thomas’ bestselling “The Hate U Give,” centering on a police shooting of a black teenager; “All Boys Aren’t Blue” by George Johnson, “This Book Is Gay” by Juno Dawson and “Beyond Magenta” by Susan Kuklin.

Two older works that previously made the list also appear: Sherman Alexie’s autobiographical novel “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison’s debut novel “The Bluest Eye.”

Caldwell-Stone said the biggest complaint about LGBTQ books is that they include content that isn’t appropriate for young people.

The biggest concerns about books that have racial themes, Caldwell-Stone said, were people claiming they promote critical race theory. Critical Race Theory, often referred to as CRT, is an academic concept that examines how policies and laws perpetuate systemic racism in the United States.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Like OMCP on Facebook and follow OMCP on Twitter and Instagram to start a conversation about this article and others.

Get the latest news and daily headlines delivered to your inbox by signing up here.

© 2022 OMCP. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located in the European Economic Area.


[ad_2]
Source link

Previous March 31 presidential debate gives UR insight into SA hopefuls
Next Printing and Related Support Activities Global Market Report 2022